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CEAPS/EALC Speaker: “Gagaku: A Brief Introduction and Thematic Cultural History”Dr. LeRon Harrison (Independent Scholar/Musician)
This lecture will provide a brief introduction to gagaku (Japanese court music) and its cultural history. The introduction section will briefly explain the four genres that make up the music and focus on the instruments used in instrumental music as a prelude to the performance. The second part will focus on the cultural history of gagaku. With a history that spans more than thirteen hundred years, the lecture will focus on themes in the history of gagaku rather than laying out a chronological history of the music. Themes such as the relationship between gagaku and Buddhism, communities of practices within and outside of the Imperial court, and the history of gagaku in the US will be introduced.

LeRon Harrison received his BA in Japanese Language and Literature from UC Berkeley in 1995, his MA in Japanese Literature from Indiana University in 2001, and his PhD in East Asian Languages and Literature from UC Irvine in 2010. His research interests focus on waka, Japanese court poetry and the appropriations of and interactions with Chinese poetry. His current book project deals with the concept of poetic immortals (kasen) and the dynamics of remembering and forgetting that occur among the textual and pictorial representations of these figures from the eighth to the eighteenth centuries.
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Speakers

LeRon Harrison
Independent Scholar/Musician
LeRon Harrison received his BA in Japanese Language and Literature from UC Berkeley in 1995, his MA in Japanese Literature from Indiana University in 2001, and his PhD in East Asian Languages and Literature from UC Irvine in 2010. His research interests focus on waka, Japanese court poetry and the appropriations of and interactions with Chinese poetry. His current book project deals with the concept of poetic immortals (kasen) and the dynamics of remembering and forgetting that occur among the textual and pictorial representations of these figures from the eighth to the eighteenth centuries.