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Eve L. Ewing: "The Afrofuturist Dialogues and Other Speculations"
Part of the INTERSEMINARS event series.

About the Speaker
Eve L. Ewing, a lifelong Chicagoan, is a writer and scholar who uses multi-genre storytelling, tools of sociological inquiry, archives, and community-grounded epistemologies to interrogate racialized histories and imagine emancipatory possibilities. Working through the lenses of Afrofuturism, Black feminism, and Du Boisian sociology, Dr. Ewing attempts to situate cultural organizing, the praxis of care, and relational accountability at the foundations of her scholarship. A former public school teacher, she is particularly interested in the role of schools as social institutions and in the ways that schools can construct, normalize, and reinforce forms of social inequality, the ways that educational inequities reflect social cruelties beyond the walls of the school building, as well as, conversely, the still-lingering possibility that educational spaces can be sites of joy and liberation.

ACCOMMODATIONS: If you will need disability-related accommodations in order to participate in this event, please contact info-hri@illinois.edu as soon as possible. Early requests are strongly encouraged to allow sufficient time to meet your access needs.

Dec 6, 2022 07:30 PM in Central Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Eve L. Ewing
Associate Professor Department of Race, Diaspora, and Indigeneity @University of Chicago
Eve L. Ewing, a lifelong Chicagoan, is a writer and scholar who uses multi-genre storytelling, tools of sociological inquiry, archives, and community-grounded epistemologies to interrogate racialized histories and imagine emancipatory possibilities. Working through the lenses of Afrofuturism, Black feminism, and Du Boisian sociology, Dr. Ewing attempts to situate cultural organizing, the praxis of care, and relational accountability at the foundations of her scholarship. A former public school teacher, she is particularly interested in the role of schools as social institutions and in the ways that schools can construct, normalize, and reinforce forms of social inequality, the ways that educational inequities reflect social cruelties beyond the walls of the school building, as well as, conversely, the still-lingering possibility that educational spaces can be sites of joy and liberation.